How To: Properly fold a letter and look professional

Properly fold a letter and look professional

From this video, learn a proper way to fold a letter professionally and place it an envelope. Basically take the letter and lay it in a flat surface, then find a spot in the paper which is almost a certain way up and then fold from bottom to that spot and crease it. Then fold from the top above the previous fold and then crease it so that it is a three fold letter. Make sure that the letter head is up when you place it inside the envelope. So that when a person opens the letter the letter head faces the person

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4 Comments

Thank You. This video confirms I have been folding my business letters right. Although I wondered from time to time, Now I know for sure!

I believe that you are inserting it incorrectly. The last fold should go in first so the recipient pull it from the envelope and the head of the letter is up. See this video:

While I agree with Jane on how to fold the letter, I respectfully disagree with Jane on how to insert the letter into the envelope. I believe the correct way to insert the letter into the envelope is by inserting the first fold in first with the second fold at the top. This way when the recipient removes the letter from the envelope, right-handed or left-handed, he/she will simply open the top 1/3 of the letter with the heading at the top. Try it :)

Jane is correct. Not only is it correct; but it is done this way out of tradition. In the old days they used to seal messages with melted wax and a personalized stamp showing proof the message was from the actual individual. This was an old version of encryption which let the recipient know it was an authentic message from the actual sender. Later, the seal was further protected by the envelope that concealed the senders identity from enemies that wanted to cut off lines of communication. There have been resume's not even read by employers simply for the fact the letter was inserted incorrectly and the applicant had already proved themselves as unworthy for employment.

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